To Mr/Mrs Stereoscope

To Mr/Mrs Stereoscope

THEY REPRESENT THE BEST OF HUMANITY

Frontline clinicians have become the face of our pandemic. Our medical doctors and nurses are living saints on the earth. They truly represent the best of humanity, rising to treat critically ill patients, as well as the collateral damage as sighted from America's fragile health care system and disordered government response.

Calling them "heroes" doesn't protect them from psychological trauma, and experts warn that a mental health crisis among health care workers could emerge in the virus's wake, we don’t want that, do we?. . They risk their health to see our planet free from the pandemic.

We write to appreciate the heroes of our nation who fight the good fight to see the pandemic brought to an end. We know your sacrifice.

Your sacrifice is highly acknowledged. It is interesting to note that Scientific American asked doctors, nurses and respiratory therapists working in hospitals across the country how they were coping with fear, processing grief and tending to their own well-being. They had to ask because truly it is not an

easy task. The risk involved is high, it takes only a true hero to sacrifice themselves to save others. Our doctors and nurses are true heroes.

Add: Interviews

Here is an interview with Ana DELGADO A Nurse, Midwife and Clinical Professor AT: San Francisco, California. Her interview topic is based on inequity and moral injury; There was a lot of talk early on about how this crisis was going to bring us all together. But what it has clarified for me is that we're not actually all in this together.

It has laid bare what most reproductive justice advocates already knew: inequity and racism have always been around. I work at the county hospital. The impact of shelter in place has been stark for my pregnant patients, many of whom are undocumented and were already living paycheck to paycheck, and now are unemployed. A patient came in yesterday and burst into tears from her desperation. I feel extremely overwhelmed by the need. There are a lot of injustices that we as clinicians are aware of and feel powerless to do much about. People call this "burnout," but one of my colleagues talks about how that seems associated with self-blame, like you got something wrong. Most people go into health care because of a deep

commitment to supporting the health and wellness of their community. When you actually become a provider, you're thrust into this system that is not really set up to promote health and wellness, and you're constantly confronted with this discrepancy. You can't rationally argue that physicians, who are trained to recognize depression and suicide risk, have one of the highest suicide rates of any profession due to "burning out." The pandemic makes these issues worse, and it's painful to witness. That's not burnout; it's a deep moral injury that people are experiencing.

Mathew Bai an emergency room physician in New York City spoke on just getting through each day. He says;

I honestly have no idea how I feel. I don't have time to digest any of this. I go to work, and then I go to sleep. Training in emergency medicine in New York, with the speed and number of patients, probably prepared me somewhat for what's happening now. But nothing can prepare you for an event of this magnitude. Everything is in flux. The upside is realizing the level of flexibility that's possible in a hospital. I'm seeing new faces in the ER all the time--nurses and doctors from other departments, even

surgeons, OBs and people flying in from all over the country. In the back of my head I'm constantly thinking, Can we manage our resources and keep our staff healthy for however long this lasts?

Aside from the reason for a global shutdown, covid 19 has also been a major source of panic in the world. Our doctors and nurses in line with God restored our hope. We say kudos and thank you

Read more

THE HUGE PRESSURE THAT COVID 19 HAS PUT ON HEALTH SYSTEMS IN LOW AND MIDDLE-INCOME COUNTRIES

THE HUGE PRESSURE THAT COVID 19 HAS PUT ON HEALTH SYSTEMS IN LOW AND MIDDLE-INCOME COUNTRIES

COVID VACCINES; A WAY OUT OR A WAY-WORSE?

COVID VACCINES; A WAY OUT OR A WAY-WORSE?

BACK IN SCHOOL

BACK IN SCHOOL